Setting Up a Support Group for People With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

One of the projects I am currently involved in is the one where I have been trying to set up a support group for people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This has, however, turned out to be one of the most challenging projects for me.

Firstly, I have come to realize that many of the people who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) don’t actually realize that they have the disorder. Statistics from medical experts tell us that a significant percentage of the population suffers from the disorder. This may be true, and there is no reason to doubt it: but a question does come up as to what percentage of these people actually know that they have the disorder.

Secondly, I have come to realize that even the people who know that they suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) don’t always view it as something they need support for. Some view it as part of their personality, part of who they are — thus they don’t view it as an illness or difficulty for which they need ‘support’.

Thirdly, I have come to accept the fact that even when the people with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) agree to be part of a support group, they tend to struggle with participation in the group. They may, for instance, have difficulties getting time to attend the group’s meetings, due to their procrastination challenges. These are, after all, people who thrive on stimulation, and activities like attending meetings simply don’t provide the kind of stimulation these folks crave for. If they occasionally find the time to attend the group’s meetings, they will tend to come late. And then having come late for the meetings, they will tend to spend most of the time on their smart-phones, or they may spend most of the time daydreaming – meaning that in the end, they don’t gain much from attending the support group meetings.