Is it Possible to Cope With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Without Using Medications?

The question as to whether it is possible to cope with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) without using medications is a difficult one. Opinion on the issue is divided. There are some experts who are of the view that it is indeed possible to cope with ADHD without using medications. Then there are other experts who are of the view that it is very hard to cope with ADHD without using medications. In a bid to navigate through these sorts of complex issues, people go to great lengths to set up online forums and establish support groups for ADHD and Asperger’s syndrome.

In trying to understand whether it is possible to cope with ADHD without using medications, we need historical perspective. Thus we have to start by noting that ADHD only started being widely diagnosed in the recent past. Thus, for years, people lived with ADHD, without knowing it, and without using any medications. Whether such people — who had ADHD, but were undiagnosed and therefore not using medications – enjoyed a high quality of life is another question altogether. The people who argue that it is possible to cope with ADHD without using medications tend to have one thing in common. They tend to be members of the school of thought that believes that the folks who push ADHD medications too much are only out to make profits. We are all conversant with the controversies surrounding the so-called ‘big pharma’.

On my part, I tried to carry out an informal survey, to establish what other people who struggle with ADHD (either themselves, or through their kids) think about the whole issue. I was trying to find out from them whether it is possible to cope with the condition without using medications. To get started, I went to www.sbcglobal.net. Once there, I proceed to log into my SBCglobal email account, after which I sent a mass email to the members of my various ADHD support groups: with the question as to whether or not it is possible to cope with ADHD without using medications.

The only conclusion I can draw from my informal survey is this: that the extent to which one can cope with ADHD without using medications depends on the severity of the ADHD. There are folks with mild cases of ADHD who are able to cope with the condition quite well without using medications. But such folks often have lower quality of life, and this is something to be aware of. There are other folks with severer cases of ADHD, and who may have difficulties coping with the condition without using medications.